eLearning Leadership Blog

Join our growing community of more than 14,000 learning professionals!

BlogHeader_3.jpg

Designing with the Learning Ecosystem Canvas

Michael Hruska, President/CEO Problem Solutions

Learning Ecosystems Thinking is Important

Learning ecosystems are places where people, systems and resources are combined in a manner to support value creation around learning and performance.  No longer is the LMS enough.  Many systems are involved to assist the development of knowledge, skills, abilities and competencies and transferring these into behaviors that impact KPIs and business outcomes.

Read More

Slides & Webcast: Six Simple eLearning Success Strategies

As instructional designers, we know the difference between presenting information and providing learning experiences. But we must often get the support of others for doing more, and that’s not always easy. Sometimes eyes glaze over as we attempt to explain all the steps necessary in creating effective instruction and getting adequate funding. So we want to be sure we aren’t making things more complicated than need be.

Read More

On the Job: 4 Insights for Engaging the Millennial Generation

by , relationship management assistant

Read More

4 Reasons To Convince Your Boss to Invest More in e-Learning

by relationship management assistant

Read More

Four e-Learning Design Practices to Leave Behind

by , vice president - training & marketing | @rhillsites

Read More

A Thanksgiving Tradition: Preparing an e-Learning Feast

by Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist

Read More

Preparing an e-Learning Feast

by Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist

As we all get ready for joining with family and friends for the Thanksgiving holidays and prepare for the big meal, it’s nearly impossible to avoid the endless advice on TV and radio about how to prepare the perfect feast.  As it turns out, so much of that advice can easily be turned to planning and preparing the perfect e-learning.

Plan Ahead and Allow Enough Time

People so often underestimate what it takes to put together a piece of e-learning.  Before you begin, create a realistic timeline, plan for how you’ll have the right resources in place, and conduct a thorough analysis.  Last minute changes, shortcuts, and substitutions almost always end up costing more and end up with an inferior end product.

Know Who’s Coming

Be mindful of your learners.  Try to find out as much as you can about them before they arrive.  Understand what they like, where they are coming from, how long they will study, what they don’t like.  This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t push your learners in new directions, but it will help you be most successful in creating a satisfying experience.

Get the Right Sized Turkey

Tradition suggests that big is always better.  By experience we know that isn’t true but it is so easy to fall into the trap.  Don’t try to prepare as much content as you possibly can and then be surprised that it’s more than learners can process.  Sometimes a very small, focused bit of instruction is actually a lot more satisfying than a comprehensive all-encompassing curriculum.  There’s a lot of evidence that smaller bits of learning spread evenly over time is more effective than the same content presented at once.

Don’t Overstuff the Bird

Many a good learning opportunity is squandered simply because too much content is forced into a learning situation that can’t support it.  A learner can only process, practice, and review a limited amount of information in a single session.  Even though the mechanics of an e-learning structure can hold an enormous quantity of content, in the learner it often creates short-term stupefaction with long-term insignificance.

Don’t Be Surprised When No One Eats the Brussels Sprouts

The more e-learning you create, the more you’ll know what works with your learners and what doesn’t—but only if you actually pay attention to users.  It is easy to keep on doing what we’ve been told to do even when we know that no one’s buying it.  For example, a hallmark of many designs is to start with a screen listing the objectives.  We know that communicating objectives enhances learning.  But that can’t happen if the learner doesn’t bother to read them.  This doesn’t mean don’t serve up the objectives; rather it means figure out how to communicate them in a way that learners actually comprehend.

You Don’t Have to Make those Canned Green Beans with the Cream of Mushroom Soup

So many people build e-learning by just recreating what they’ve seen others do: list the objectives, give a pretest, deliver content, insert knowledge checks, display a summary, and deliver a post test.  It’s a perfectly functional structure, but it isn’t particularly good.  And it’s utterly forgettable.  With each e-learning project, push yourself to make sure that each element is there because it serves a specific purpose, not simply to implement it because it’s something the organization has always done.

Read More

The Progression of Award-winning Irises and e-Learning

by Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist

Any of you who’ve been in one of my classes have probably seen this photo of my Mom in our field of irises.  I spent part of this weekend replanting a portion of this iris garden, accomplishing a project I’ve been planning for years.  The American Iris Society has given an award, the Dykes Medal, nearly every year since 1928 for the best iris new iris cultivar.  I’m a freak about collecting sets of things and so naturally I’ve made it a goal to get all the Dykes Medal winners; now that my collection is nearly complete, I’m putting out a garden exclusively of winners in which they are planted in chronological order.  As I was arranging the plants in order, I was thinking of the varieties and marveling at how consistently these represent an almost unbroken progression of improvement in clarity of color, substance, size, bud count, and flower form. Except for a few exceptions, there’s a very clear tradition of consistent improvement over time.  You could pretty much use the Dykes Medal winners as a ruler to place almost any other iris into the decade it was introduced simply because progress has happened in iris hybridization with such regularity.

Read More

The Road to e-Learning Success

by Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist

Read More

The Best Content for e-Learning

by Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist

Read More