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eLearning Development

ID Essentials: Three Steps When There’s Too Much Content for One Course

By Ann Iverson, Senior Instructional Designer 

In last month’s ID Essentials blog, we were instructional designers at World of Wings, Inc., a commercial airline dedicated to safety. We covered how to unpack those big, overstuffed objectives by first aligning them with business goals and then breaking them apart into smaller tasks. Now, let’s turn to a new issue at World of Wings.

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Six Achievable & Effective Techniques to Enhance Learner Motivation

By Ethan Edwards, Chief Instructional Strategist/ @ethanaedwards

We often talk about the importance of motivation in e-learning instructional design. In fact, we’ve even said that motivation is often more important than the specific content when seeking to maximize the impact of instruction—particularly in e-learning, where relatively few social or external environmental factors are likely to inspire learners.

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ID Essentials: Four Simple Steps to Unpack Objectives

By Ann Iverson, Senior Instructional Designer 

Congratulations on starting your career with World of Wings, Inc.! Your onboarding begins now. As an airline pilot in training, you need to know and do a lot of things to achieve our goal of flight safety! We don’t have any time to waste, so let’s get started.

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Lessons on Instructional Design from…my Dog

By Carly Yuenger, Senior Instructional Designer 

For the last two-and-a-half years, I’ve been the primary trainer to my dog, but for some reason, my mind has kept this task separate from my daylighting work as an instructional designer. Most days, I’d venture to say that I’m a better instructional designer than dog trainer, so the reason may be simple ego-protection.

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Four Instructional Design Lessons Inspired by the Lord of the Rings

By Kody Jackson, MA, Instructional Writer Intern

Instructional design is a lot like The Lord of the Rings. This isn’t the most obvious of comparisons, I’ll admit. Everyone in Middle Earth, after all, rides around on horses. We certainly don’t get to do that here at Allen Interactions...at least not until the Culture Committee puts in that petting zoo I’ve been begging for. We also don’t have swords. The pen may be mightier, but it definitely lacks the same “cool” factor.

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Pokémon Go: 3 Lessons for Instructional Designers

By Edmond ManningSenior Instructional Strategist

Surely you’ve heard the news stories.

Pokémon Go players lured to robberies or stepping blindly into traffic. On Facebook, I read a friend’s post describing how her car was rear-ended at a stoplight. Yes, the driver was playing Pokémon Go. Yes, he confessed this to the police, alleviating my friend from any responsibility. A Florida news anchor walked right into the live weather forecast, too busy catching imaginary animals to pay attention.

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Gameful Design

By Edmond ManningSenior Instructional Strategist

I want you to read every line of this blog post, so here’s what I’m going to do. I will give you 50 points, and you can use those points to buy an avatar and accessories. No, wait—

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Dear Savvy

Remember Dear Abby? Well, here is her counterpart in the Instructional Design field… 

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Five St. Patrick's Inspired Instructional Design Traditions

By CARRIE ZENS, Director of Marketing

Happy St. Patrick's Day everyone! In celebration of this religious and cultural holiday here's a blog Ethan Edwards, chief instructional strategist, wrote last year about five instructional design traditions inspired by its celebratory customs and green-filled festivities.

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The Power of “Test Then Tell” in e-Learning Design

By Ethan Edwards, Chief Instructional Strategist / @ethanedwards 

One of the most powerful design ideas for creating good e-learning also seems to be the one that designers find hardest to accept and adopt. It is the “test then tell” approach at the heart of learner-centered design. Simply put, “test then tell” encourages us to begin an instructional sequence, not with content, but by presenting the learner with a challenge—some specific task or test of performance—and then provide content by way of feedback based on how learners did.

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